Okay, so we know its not cool for a teacher to use an example that refers to their own youth.  Such a ploy is guaranteed to get a young person's eyes rolling and, besides, it explodes that myth that all teachers were born with the onset of premature middle-age.  However, if you want to indulge yourself, why not use this story from the BBC  that shows how the makers of SodaStream, the suburban must-have gadget of the 1970s and 80s, are attempting to appeal to a new market.

Reading this article immediately made me think of the product life-cycle model and how a business may use an extension strategy to prolong sales.  It appears that the initial market for the SodaStream, aimed at customers who saw fizzy drinks as a luxury item for children in the 1970s (with very little consideration of the health implications) is being replaced by a new generation which is concerned about the environment and wishing to avoid an excessive use of cans or bottles by creating their own carbonated drinks at home.

I've included an animated Powerpoint slide illustrating the Product Life-Cycle model.  Use it on its own or insert it into your own presentation.

product_life_cycle.pptx 

I wonder if they still make Dandelion and Burdock flavour?

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